Michael Barnett

Michael Barnett

Michael Barnett is a senior scientist at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab.  Together with Erik Johansson, he was the original co-coordinator of the ATLAS outreach group and helped develop the original website, various brochures, the large ATLAS mural, events such as LHC first Physics, a  3D viewer,  a DVD with ten of the best ATLAS videos, and an article for Scientific American on the art and science of ATLAS.  Exercises were produced to allow high school students to analyze actual events (eventually extended to masterclasses).  In connection with the movie Angels & Demons, developed various

A Search for New Physics Processes using Dijet Events

The ATLAS Experiment has extended the energy frontier of searches for new particles and new processes beyond those of the Standard Model by studying collision events with so-called "dijets".

21st June 2011

Is Nature Supersymmetric?

String Theory predicts a new symmetry, called "supersymmetry", that could shed light on some of today's mysteries of fundamental particles and interactions. In supersymmetry, every particle-type should have a "shadow" particle called a super-partner that (in general) has a much higher mass. The ATLAS Experiment has analyzed the first year of its LHC data and searched for evidence of these super-partners of ordinary matter.

24th May 2011

ATLAS Experiment Reports Its First Physics Results from the LHC

The first physics results from the ATLAS Experiment with proton-proton collisions at an energy of 0.9 TeV in late 2009 have now been accepted for publication in the journal Physics Letters B.

17th March 2010

First collisions in ATLAS

A few days ago, loud cheers and happy faces filled the ATLAS Control Room while the whole detector lit up: protons are back at the experiment's door, and everybody forgot in a second the long year of waiting for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) to resume operation.

23rd November 2009

LHC beams and events back in ATLAS

Loud cheers and happy faces fill the ATLAS Control Room while the whole detector lights up: protons are back today at the experiment's door, and everybody forgets in a second the long year of waiting for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) to resume operation.

21st November 2009

Progress on Toroid Magnets

The magnets on either end of the ATLAS detector (called end–cap toroid magnets) dominated November’s work in the experimental cavern. The ATLAS magnet team took a significant step towards finishing work on the ATLAS detector as testing of the magnets began.

10th December 2007